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Mary B. Ansari Distinguished Service Award

Winners and Citations

Ansari Service Award Procedures

2016

Shaun Hardy

2015

Michael Noga

2014

Lura E. Joseph

2013

No award

2012

No award

2011

Claren M. Kidd

2010

Julie Hallmark

2009

Sharon Tahirkheli

2008

Connie J. Manson

2007

John G. Mulvihill

2006

Dederick C. Ward

2005

Charlotte R. M. Derksen
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

April. 28, 2017

SHAUN HARDY HONORED FOR DISTINGUISHED SERVICE


Shaun Hardy, librarian at the Geophysical Laboratory Library of the Carnegie Institution of Washington, is the recipient of the 2016 Mary B. Ansari Distinguished Service Award from the Geoscience Information Society (GSIS). GSIS is an international professional organization devoted to improving the exchange of information in the geosciences through cooperation among scientists, librarians, editors, cartographers, educators, and information professionals.

Shaun joined the Geophysical Laboratory Library of the Carnegie Institution of Washington as its librarian in 1989. He directs all operations for the 40,000-volume library supporting advanced research in the earth and space sciences. In 2012 the Carnegie Institution presented him the Service to Science Award.

Shaun is highly regarded in GSIS for his willingness to step in when help is needed. Letters in support of his nomination emphasized his supportive and collegial nature. One letter said, “He is the epitome of the engaged professional—serving the GSIS as an officer and committee member, the broader geoscience community via his service on the GeoRef Advisory Board, and sharing his expertise with his colleagues in an upbeat, always supportive manner.” Another letter stated, “His service to GSIS and other professional societies, his outstanding work at Carnegie, his publication record, and his support of individuals in the profession are all notable.”

Shaun joined GSIS in 1994. He served the society as secretary in 1999-2000, as acting treasurer in 2001, and as publicity officer from 2005-2010 and 2013 to present. He currently serves on the Ad Hoc Committee for the GSIS 50th Anniversary Celebration. For fourteen years he has been a member of the GeoRef Advisory Committee of the American Geosciences Institute. In addition to his service in GSIS, he is also a member of the Physics-Astronomy-Math Division of the Special Libraries Association, the American Geophysical Union, and DC Science Librarians.

Shaun has developed a passion for open access and has shared it with his profession. His paper “Open Access Publishing in the Geosciences: Case Study of the Deep Carbon Observatory,” published in the GSIS Proceedings v. 43, 2012, p. 73-81, won the 2014 GSIS Best Paper Award.

Shaun graduated summa cum laude with a B.S. degree in geological sciences and physics from the University of Rochester. He received an M.L.S. degree from the School of Information and Library Studies at the State University of New York at Buffalo. He previously was chief librarian for the Buffalo Society of Natural Sciences, Buffalo Museum of Science.

The Mary B. Ansari Distinguished Service Award was established in 2005 through the generous support of Ms. Ansari, Director Emerita for Branch Libraries and Administrative Services at the University of Nevada-Reno and President of the Geoscience Information Society in 1990.

[Story by Jody Bales Foote]


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Nov. 17, 2015

MICHAEL NOGA HONORED FOR DISTINGUISHED SERVICE


Michael Mark Noga, Collections Strategist at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology Libraries, was honored by the Geoscience Information Society (GSIS) with the 2015 Mary B. Ansari Distinguished Service Award. The award was presented on November 2 at the Society’s annual meeting in Baltimore and recognizes significant contributions to the field of geoscience information.

Noga has been a geoscience information professional for more than three decades. He holds an M.S. in library and information science from Case Western Reserve University and an M.A. in geography from the University of Cincinnati. Prior to his position at MIT he served as Head of Collection Development and Acquisitions for Physical Sciences and Technology Libraries and Head of the Geology/Geophysics Library at the University of California, Los Angeles. Before that he was Acting Assistant Head of the Branner Earth Sciences Library at Stanford University.

“Michael has a sophisticated understanding of collection development issues that is both admired and appreciated by his colleagues,” commented Jody Bales Foote (University of Oklahoma), chair of the selection committee. “He is highly regarded for the effort he makes to get to know the faculty members and students he works with in order to understand how they seek, use, and share information.”

The serial literature of the geosciences has long been a focus of Noga’s professional research, in particular journal cost, retention, and preservation issues. He received the GSIS Best Paper Award in 1993 for his analysis of usage patterns of geoscience journals. His study on conference papers in geoscience proceedings won the award in 2005. Noga has served on the Publications Committee of both the Geological Society of America and the American Geophysical Union and currently is Vice-Chair of the GeoScienceWorld Board of Directors. He served as president of the Geoscience Information Society in 2002.

The Ansari Distinguished Service Award was established in 2005 through the generous support of Mary B. Ansari, Director Emerita for Branch Libraries and Administrative Services at the University of Nevada-Reno and past president of the Geoscience Information Society.

[Photo caption: Michael Mark Noga, recipient of the 2015 Mary B. Ansari Distinguished Service Award.]


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Dec. 4, 2014

LURA JOSEPH HONORED FOR DISTINGUISHED SERVICE


Lura E. Joseph, Content Access and Research Services Librarian at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (UIUC), was honored recently by the Geoscience Information Society (GSIS) with the 2014 Mary B. Ansari Distinguished Service Award. The award was presented in October at the society’s annual meeting in Vancouver, British Columbia and recognizes significant contributions to the field of geoscience information.

Joseph’s distinguished record of professional activity and research was key to her selection, in particular her work documenting geological field trip guidebooks. “Lura is recognized as a vocal advocate for the recognition of the value of guidebooks to the geoscience literature,” commented Jody Foote (University of Oklahoma) on behalf of the selection committee.

Joseph chaired the GSIS Guidebooks Committee for many years and is a principal contributor to the American Geosciences Institute’s Geologic Guidebooks of North America Database. She is the author of nine peer-reviewed journal articles as well as numerous book chapters, reviews, and conference and workshop presentations. Her research on image and figure quality in digitized journal backfile packages garnered the GSIS Best Paper Award in 2007. From 2001 to 2012 Joseph served as Geology and Digital Projects Librarian at UIUC. She is a past president of the Geoscience Information Society and edited the 2004 GSIS Proceedings. For several years she was an instructor in the “Geoscience Librarianship 101” short course offered to new professionals in the field.

The Ansari Distinguished Service Award was established in 2005 through the generous support of Mary B. Ansari, Director Emerita for Branch Libraries and Administrative Services, University of Nevada-Reno and past president of the Geoscience Information Society.

The Geoscience Information Society is an international professional organization devoted to improving the exchange of information in the earth sciences. The membership consists of librarians, editors, cartographers, educators, and information professionals. Information about the Society may be found at its website www.geoinfo.org.

For the full citation to Lura's award, see the June 2014 issue of the GSIS Newsletter, pages 13-14.


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Oct. 31, 2011

CLAREN M. KIDD HONORED FOR DISTINGUISHED SERVICE


Claren M. Kidd, retired Professor of Bibliography and Librarian of the L.S. Youngblood Energy Library, University of Oklahoma, was honored with the 2011 Mary B. Ansari Distinguished Service Award at a ceremony in Minneapolis, Minnesota during the Geological Society of America's Annual Meeting. The award is given by the Geoscience Information Society in recognition of significant contributions to the geoscience information profession.

Kidd was the geology librarian at the University of Oklahoma for over 30 years. She began in 1973 and was active in the geoscience information community until her retirement in 2006. She specialized in the identification and organization of gray literature important to geoscientists, particularly maps and field trip guidebooks.

Kidd's interest in gray literature led to her participation in the development of a union list of Australian field trip guidebooks, published by the Australian Bureau of Mineral Resources, Geology and Geophysics. She also developed a union list of 4,000 unpublished, manuscript and archival geological maps of New Zealand, which was published by the New Zealand Geological Survey. Closer to home, she endorsed the Geoscience Information Society's initiative to improve access to guidebooks, serving as a contributor and compiler for the 3rd, 4th, 5th and 6th editions of The Union List of Field Trip Guidebooks of North America.

In the librarian community Kidd has been a mainstay. A member of the Geoscience Information Society since 1973, she joined her first committee, Guidebooks and Ephemeral Publications, in 1974 and continued on the committee until 2000. Other committees she served on over the years include: Open File Reports, Construction of Guidelines for Authors/Publishers of Geologic Field Trip Guidebooks, and Guidebook Standards. In 1984 as Vice President, she organized the annual meeting and technical session and then, as President, edited Proceedings XV.

Writing on behalf of the selection committee, Michael Noga stated "with a style marked by civility, congeniality and grace, Claren often took on projects filled with 'heavy lifting.' She is now honored for her sustained and significant contributions of unstinting service over three decades to the geoscience and geoscience information communities from the local to the international levels."

The Ansari Distinguished Service Award was established in 2005 through the generous support of Mary B. Ansari, Director Emerita for Branch Libraries and Administrative Services, University of Nevada-Reno and past president of the Geoscience Information Society.


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Sept. 3, 2010

JULIE HALLMARK HONORED FOR DISTINGUISHED SERVICE


Julie Hallmark, Professor Emeritus, University of Texas, will be honored with the 2010 Mary B. Ansari Distinguished Service Award at the annual meeting of the Geoscience Information Society in Denver, October 31 - November 3. The award is given by GSIS in recognition of significant contributions to the geoscience information profession.

Julie’s career as an educator from 1969 to 2003 has been distinguished by her interest in scientific communication, user behavior, and emerging technologies. For nearly 40 years she has made important contributions in these areas. Her impact has been felt nationally and internationally.

Through her research Julie has sought to understand how scientists seek, use, and disseminate information, and how digital technology interfaces with those processes. Papers such as "Geoscience Information Sources and Services from the User's Viewpoint" (1978), "End User Database Searching in Geoscience" (1987), "Information Seeking Behavior of Geoscientists" (with Dederick Ward, 1989), and "Methods Used by Geoscientists to Access and Retrieve References Cited in Their Journal Articles" (1994) span her career. Coincidentally they also document the evolution of information technology in support of scientific inquiry.

In illuminating the processes of information search and retrieval, Julie’s research has helped information professionals re-shape their products, services and perspectives. In a 1974 paper Julie stated prophetically that digital bibliographic databases would become more important than print bibliographies. At the time few people saw this possibility. GeoRef, like many databases, had been designed to produce a print publication, the Bibliography and Index of Geology. Julie’s paper describing changes that were needed in GeoRef to facilitate database searching was imaginative and persuasive. The thoughtful changes she advised, as well as others she called for subsequently as a member of the GeoRef Advisory Committee, were largely adopted to the continuing benefit of the geoscience community.

Her preference for viewing communication and information resources from the user’s perspective has been an abiding theme of her work. Long before it was popular she understood the importance of a user-centered approach to information organization and services. The librarian, she urged her students, must first understand users and how they work before designing library services or hoping to have an impact. Readily accessible, she was fond of new ideas, opened many eyes, and inspired students to think creatively. In addition to teaching in the UT School of Information, Julie has lectured and taught in Mexico, Argentina, Cuba, Romania, Australia, China, Guatemala, and the Philippines. Her efforts to encourage library education in Latin America have been noteworthy. She has traveled extensively in the region and used her considerable personal charm and confidence to attract new members to the profession of librarianship. Her perspective on science librarianship has been invigorating.

Julie joined the Geoscience Information Society in 1966, a year after its founding. She served on numerous committees and was devoted to the success of the society. Her keen intellect, bountiful enthusiasm and energy have engaged people in projects they may have otherwise been reluctant to join. As President (1979) she was instrumental in making GSIS more professional, with a broader outlook and hence a wider impact. With colleagues she established international conferences in geoscience information, six of which have been held to date. Her frequent presentations at GSA meetings have broadened understanding of scholarly communication and the issues in geoscience information. Her papers twice earned the GSIS Best Paper Award (1987, 1990). She was active in the American Society for Information Science, the Texas Library Association, and the Special Libraries Association. She also served on the SLA Board of Directors and the American Geological Institute Executive Committee.

A valuable colleague, Julie has always been well-informed, perceptive and willing to share her knowledge. Her generosity of spirit has been inclusive, positive and encouraging. Whether working independently or collaboratively her efforts have greatly enriched the geoscience information community and the people who populate it.


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Jan. 4, 2010

SHARON TAHIRKHELI HONORED FOR DISTINGUISHED SERVICE


Sharon Tahirkheli, director of information systems at the American Geological Institute (AGI), was honored with the 2009 Mary B. Ansari Distinguished Service Award at the annual meeting of the Geoscience Information Society in Portland, Oregon. The award is given by GSIS in recognition of significant contributions to the geoscience information profession.

Tahirkheli has worked in the field of geoscience information for more than 30 years. She started as an indexer for GeoRef and now oversees production of that database as well as other AGI information products and services such as the Cold Regions Bibliographies, GeoRef Previews, and Document Delivery. During the last decade Tahirkheli was instrumental in establishing GeoScienceWorld, an aggregate of linked and interoperable Earth science journals and, for six years, served both on the GSW Board of Directors and as the organization's treasurer. As a member of the Management Council of the Digital Library for Earth System Education (DLESE), she led cataloging efforts that provided metadata for the DLESE Community Collection and helped shape development of the information system.

Her service in the international arena includes the Working Group for the Multilingual Thesaurus of Geosciences, an initiative of the IUGS Commission for the Management and Application of Geoscience Information. The author of numerous publications, she has used the literature to raise awareness of new resources and changes in the delivery of information. A frequent speaker at professional meetings, conferences and workshops, Tahirkheli is a past president (2001) of the Geoscience Information Society.


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Oct. 7, 2008

CONNIE MANSON HONORED FOR DISTINGUISHED SERVICE


The Geoscience Information Society's 2008 Mary B. Ansari Distinguished Service Award was presented on October 7 to Connie J. Manson of Olympia, Washington.  For many years Manson served as Geology Librarian at the Washington Division of Natural Resources, where she published more than one hundred bibliographies on the geology, mineral resources, urban planning, and natural hazards of the state. She also compiled several volumes of Index to Geologic and Geophysical Mapping of Washington. “Improving access to geoscience information from government agencies has been a hallmark of Connie’s career,” according to Patricia B. Yocum (University of Michigan), chair of the selection committee. "Connecting information with people is a core value which Connie exemplifies in her approach to her work." Prior to her work in Washington Manson worked at the Wyoming Department of Economic Planning and Development, where she published several books.

Manson served as editor of the GSIS Newsletter from 1986 to 2007, taking only one respite while serving as the Society’s vice-president/president/ past-president in 1997-1999. While in office she edited The Costs and Values of Geoscience Information, co-edited Accreting the Continent’s Collections, and participated in organizing the Sixth International Conference on Geoscience Information, held in Washington, D.C. in 1998. She subsequently edited the conference proceedings, Science Editing and Information Management, published in 1999. In the 1990s she compiled two editions of the Society’s widely-used Directory of Geoscience Libraries, United States and Canada. She served as the GSIS representative to the Geological Society of America’s Publications Committee, among other appointments.

Commenting on Manson’s award, longtime colleague Jim O’Donnell (Caltech) summarized: "Connie has always been willing to mentor and encourage new members to the profession. She is noted for the extraordinary efforts she will make to help a patron or a fellow librarian find the information they’re seeking. She’s been an enthusiastic and productive member of both GSIS and the profession."

Manson is currently working with the American Geological Institute on special bibliographic projects for GeoRef, the world’s leading database of geoscience literature.


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
November 30, 2007

FORMER GEOREF DIRECTOR HONORED FOR DISTINGUISHED SERVICE


The Geoscience Information Society's 2007 Mary B. Ansari Distinguished Service Award was presented on October 30 to John Mulvihill of Vienna, Virginia.  For twenty-five years Mulvihill directed the American Geological Institute's GeoRef Information System. GeoRef is the world's primary indexing service for earth science literature.

Mulvihill assumed the leadership of GeoRef in 1974, after a decade of work with the Central Abstracting and Indexing Service of the American Petroleum Institute. Prior to that he held librarian positions at Astra Pharmaceutical Products in Worcester, Massachusetts and St. Benedict's College in Atchison, Kansas. At the American Geological Institute (AGI) Mulvihill dramatically expanded GeoRef's content and constituency. Its coverage was extended back to 1785 and by the time of his retirement in 1998 the database had grown to 2.1 million references in 40 languages.

Speaking for the Ansari Award Committee, Claren Kidd (University of Oklahoma Geology Librarian, emerita) stated "John's ability and foresight to develop GeoRef have had a profound influence upon the geoscience information community and the entire geoscience community." Mulvihill forged strong collegial links with members of the Geoscience Information Society (GSIS) and relied on librarians' input on GeoRef coverage and priorities, as well as for help in assessing its effectiveness. He served as president of GSIS in 1978 and worked with the Society in supporting international conferences on geoscience information. He also facilitated production of the Union List of Geologic Field Trip Guidebooks - a joint project of AGI and GSIS - in both print and online versions.

Sharon Tahirkheli, GeoRef's current director, added "John's dedication to information services and his deep understanding of the needs of the geoscientist resulted in his receiving the AGI William B. Heroy Award upon his retirement. This award, usually presented to geoscientists, was presented to John in recognition of his distinguished service to AGI and to the geoscience profession in general."

Since retiring from AGI Mulvihill has worked with the Fairfax County (Virginia) Public Library


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
January 29, 2007

WARD HONORED FOR DISTINGUISHED PROFESSIONAL SERVICE

Geology librarian Dederick C. (Dedy) Ward of Anacortes, Washington was honored recently by the Geoscience Information Society (GSIS) for distinguished service to the profession.  In accepting the 2006 Mary B. Ansari Distinguished Service Award on Ward’s behalf at the Society’s Philadelphia meeting, Lura E. Joseph (Geology Librarian, University of Illinois) cited Ward’s extensive contributions to the professionalization of geoscience librarianship and his personal scholarship.  Ward was one of the founding members of the Geoscience Information Society in 1965 and served as co-chair of the first International Conference on Geological Information, held in London in 1978.  The meeting brought together for the first time specialists who dealt in geoscientific information; 190 delegates from 17 countries participated. He was author or co-author of three editions of Geologic Reference Sources published between 1967 and 1981.  The classic work helped educate generations of information specialists.  In 1984, together with Albert Carozzi, Ward published Geology Emerging, a catalog illustrating the history of geology through rare books held by the University of Illinois library.  His 1989 study of “Information-seeking behavior of geoscientists,” co-authored with Julie Bichteler, won the GSIS Best Paper Award the following year. 

Ward holds degrees in geology from Washington and Lee University and the University of Colorado and an MA in librarianship from the University of Denver.  In the 1960s and 1970s he served as Head of Science Libraries and Earth Science Librarian at the University of Colorado, Boulder.  In 1980 he moved to the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign as Geology Librarian and Associate Professor of Library Administration.  He retired from UIUC in 1989 to pursue another love, painting.  His art reflects his interest and background in geology.

Richard D. Walker, a long-time colleague, summarized:  “Dedy was always mindful of the role information played in the lives of both the working geoscientist and the geoscience information specialist and was always ready to act as the liaison between those professions.”


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
November 29, 2005 

CHARLOTTE DERKSEN IS THE WINNER OF THE FIRST MARY B. ANSARI DISTINGUISHED SERVICE AWARD.


The award, given for the first time this year, recognizes significant contributions to the geoscience information profession.  In presenting the award on October 18, selection committee chair Claren Kidd (University of Oklahoma) cited Derksen’s professional leadership, research, and service to users of geoscience information.  “Charlotte's distinguished career has also included being a mentor of future geoscience librarians,” Kidd added.  “She’s been an innovator and a staunch advocate for geoscience libraries.”

Derksen was head librarian of the Branner Earth Sciences Library and Map Collections at Stanford from 1980 until her retirement in 2004.  At Branner, she instituted instruction, database searching, and extensive collection development programs, and added map catalogers and GIS experts to the staff.  Her expertise in digital geoscience data was widely known and shared through many presentations and papers on the subject.  She also conducted cost and use studies to assess the value of geoscience literature.  Derksen was active in the Geoscience Information Society, the Cartographic Users Advisory Council, and the American Geological Institute.  She served on advisory committees for GeoRef and GeoScienceWorld, and on the Geological Society of America’s Publications Committee.  The publication of the fifth edition of the Union List of Geologic Field Trip Guidebooks of North America in 1989 owed much to her involvement.  Since her retirement from Stanford, she has been working on indexing projects for GeoRef.


updated April 17, 2012